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Success Stories

Among the three million European SMEs that are exploring the global market, more and more are succeeding in China. Read their stories below to find out how they have benefited from the services at the EU SME Centre and made their first entry successfully in China. 

Success Stories

Getting Chinese Tourists on Board

In 2012, over 83 million Chinese tourists travelled abroad and spent more than €75 billion overseas, making China the world’s largest outbound tourism market. Dreamboat, a Czech SME providing travel services for tourists and business groups from Asia, began to gain a foothold in this booming market in 2012. The company identified European cruise trips as a niche market that has not yet been fully exploited in China, and began to partner with Chinese companies and the Czech Tourism Office in China to organise Danube River cruise trips for Chinese tourists.

The EU SME Centre supported Dreamboat during its early stage of establishment in China. The Centre’s free hot-desking service provided its staff a professional working environment while it was developing partnerships with local travel agencies in Beijing. The Centre’s guidelines and webinars explaining changes in China’s visa rules also kept the company informed of updates that affected its employees working in China. 

Among the advice offered to SMEs preparing to do business in China, Zofia Guranova, the company’s China sales manager, mentioned that conducting proper due diligence on potential Chinese partners is one of the most important first steps to take.

“I can highly recommend the Centre’s hot-desks to any European SME that wants to start up a business in China or is coming to Beijing for a business trip. The Centre also offers benefits that I personally find really helpful - for instance a consultation with an experienced specialist in both the legal and business field. Moreover, the location is perfect and the atmosphere is really friendly; the staff is always willing to help.”

-Zofia Guranova, Sales Manager, Dreamboat

Visit Dreamboat website

Catering Artisan Cuisine to Chinese Palettes

Marco Polo Import Export is a food & beverage company with a special focus on Spanish gourmet food. Setting foot in the China market, first in Guangzhou, as early as 2008 to export red table wines, the company saw the demand for authentic Mediterranean cuisine and soon expanded its product portfolio to a wide range of artisan food, including cured ham, fish & vegetable preserves, chocolates & sweets and frozen prepared food. Marco Polo aims to deliver not only staple Spanish gourmet to high-end hotels and restaurants, but also a fine dining experience through restaurant design and catering management. 
 
Currently Marco Polo is making progress on two frontiers: using a franchise model to sell a leading Spanish chocolate and sweets brand Torrons Vicens (founded in 1775) in Tianjin; and collaborating with more distributors for their high potential frozen prepared food products, which are easy to make, very safe, and convenient to prepare.
 
The EU SME Centre has become a primary contact point for Marco Polo in its market approach. Through the Ask-the-Expert channel, the Centre’s enquiry help hotline, our experts assisted Marco Polo in understanding standard and conformity issues for imported chocolates, provided legal advice for franchising, and helped in identifying partners for business development. The company also got the chance to attend the World of Food Exhibition (2015) in Beijing and met face-to-face with our experts there.
 
Finding the right business partners in China can be a very challenging task. The Centre helped introduce Marco Polo to local contacts, as well as to deepen their cultural understandings to obtain more valid feedback. 
 
“My tip for SMEs: get someone on your team that speaks Chinese. It demonstrates your commitment to the market and will give you an understanding that you otherwise wouldn’t get.”
 
The future looks bright; Marco Polo is now looking to open a store in northern China and is in negotiation with business partners in Tianjin, introduced by the EU SME Centre. 
 
“Our company registered with the Centre and participated in various online seminars regarding different business areas for China, which we found to be very concise and useful. Furthermore, there is always a professional reply to my enquiries from your expert team…I felt grateful to receive those comments and to know whether our company is going the right direction or not. China is known to me, however it is changing ever so fast and it is always difficult to keep up with! “
 
-Marco Piccioni, Marketing Director, Marco Polo

Visit Marco Polo website

Tapping into China’s Corporate E-Learning Market

Gothia Logistics AB is a Swedish company that develops online training programmes in logistics, lean production and purchasing in order to help clients increase efficiency and improve productivity. Active in China since 2003, the company has been offering online training courses in both English and Chinese for employees in factories around the Yangtze River Delta region.

With the help of the Centre’s business development team, Gothia Logistics found a list of companies to participate in a research project on the difference in continued education between companies with various cultural backgrounds.

The Centre’s webinar on “How can foreigners establish an office in China?” helped the company acquire essential information on setting up a legal entity in China. Gothia Logistics also received comprehensive advice on employment arrangement forms available for wholly foreign-owned enterprises (WFOEs) in China.  

We used a great deal of services from the EU SME Centre’s website, especially the online enquiry service which allowed us to ask more specific questions on HR & legal issues. In addition, the Centre’s webinars are good sources of more resources. The EU SME Centre has been a great support for us when setting up our business in China. 

 

-Kjell-Åke Rönnberg, CEO, Gothia Logistics AB

Visit Gothia Logistics AB website

Supporting Chinese Hospitals with Clinical Products from Ireland

The Irish company Serosep is a leading producer of laboratory diagnostic products that are broadly used in hospitals and clinical practices. After identifying China as a market with huge potential for their products, Managing Director Dermot Scanlon and Export Sales Manager Eoin Kelleher had the idea of opening up a wholly foreign-owned enterprise (WFOE) in China. However, after attending a seminar of the EU SME Centre and enquiring several times with the Centre’s experts, they realised that it would be better to start with working with a distributor instead.

Dermot and Eoin then found Beijing ALT Biotech, a Chinese distributor with knowledge of the healthcare market in China. Together they completed the lengthy process of registering their company and products in China. This took more than 6 months, but then sales could finally start in China. At the time of the interview with Eoin, he expected the first order to be coming in the following weeks and it shipped from Serosep in May 2014. For the beginning the target clients are private practices and laboratories that work for private hospitals.

Serosep first got to know the EU SME Centre through another Irish SME. They took part in many of the Centre’s webinars and used the documents in the Knowledge Centre on the EU SME Centre website. In the beginning they sent several enquiries about setting up a WFOE in China through the Ask-the-Expert service. The information they received from the Centre made them change their perception of how to do business in China and how difficult it would be to enter the market. It directly impacted Serosep’s change of strategy.

We appreciated the competent advice from your experts very much. The seminar was brilliant. The legal expert who held it could answer every single detailed question. We left without one open question still in mind.

-Eoin Kelleher, Export Sales Manager, Serosep 

Visit Serosep Ltd. website

Adapting Mediterranean Food to China

UR Great is a Greek company specialised in the production and sales of healthy and natural Mediterranean food products. The founder and owner Mikis Pollalis wants his brand to relay the image of a traveler bringing healthy Mediterranean food back from his holiday.

As many others, UR Great took notice of the huge potential the Chinese market offers. They decided to make entering this market their strategic priority and began researching on this topic. At this time, Mikis attended an EU SME Centre presentation in Athens.  He learned there that good preparation is paramount to success in China, thus he started to gather information on the food and beverage market. After researching Chinese tastes, he prepared his team back at home ready to adapt the marketing strategy, especially the products, to suit the Chinese market. 

The EU SME Centre was able to offer different types of help at different stages. The presentation by one of the Centre experts was an eye-opener for the founder of UR Great, since it showed that many different aspects needed to be considered when entering the Chinese market and that preparation was a prerequisite for sustainable success. Mikis says the take-home message from this event was “a company should be ready to enter China and a lot of preparations are required”. 

He continues to use the free services of the Centre and rates them highly. The webinars provided him with reliable and relevant information he immediately incorporated in his strategy and action plan. As a final step, the CEO of UR Great approached the Business Development experts via the Ask-the-Expert feature on the EU SME Centre website. Upon their request, they received a list of potential food importers. 

I believe that the most important help of the EU SME Centre is that it provided a helpful framework for entering the Chinese market. It set from the beginning the correct foundation, by pointing out the important key learning facts regarding business in China and helped us create a roadmap to entering the Chinese market. Moreover, we received valuable knowledge from the experience of the EU SME regarding the pitfalls and problems we should avoid. 

Mikis Pollalis, Founder and CEO of UR Great

 

Visit UR Great website

Getting the First Container of Beer from the UK to China

Lancaster Brewery is a British company producing and selling a variety of beer products such as ales and ciders, located in the North West of England. 

The company entered the Chinese market in July 2016, successfully reaching the country and clearing the customs in less than a month. It targets Guangdong province to start with but plans to expand business in other first-tier Chinese cities with a focus on Shanghai in the near future.

Lancaster Brewery is currently exporting to China with the assistance of a local Chinese business partner who is handling the process of customs clearance and relabelling in bonded warehouses.  The company has also planned to send an employee to Guangzhou for a period of six months to represent the brand in the market, provide support to the partner and develop a network of distribution channels. 

During their market research process, Lancaster Brewery came across the EU SME Centre’s content online, including the webinar on Alcoholic Drinks Market in China and publications on the Food & Beverage Market in China and Ways to Enter the Chinese Market.  The information helped the company better understand the technicalities of exporting products to China and to clarify the requirements for labelling, customs procedures, and intellectual property protection in China.

The Alcoholic Drinks Market in China webinar, held on May 10th, provided me with crucial data to pitch the China opportunity to our company board and win their approval.

- Giulia Ravasi, International Export Manager at Lancaster Brewery

Lancaster Brewery aims to position its brand in a niche market in China to attract affluent consumers, including expatriates and Chinese who have previously worked or studied abroad and therefore have developed a taste and preference for foreign food products and brands.

As advice for other European businesses interested in the Chinese market, Giulia emphasised on the role of establishing trusted relationships with Chinese business partners, doing market research and willingness to look for help.

“Do your research and look for help. Sometimes SMEs lack the specific knowledge and skills required for such a challenging process, but help is available out there to overcome these obstacles and barriers”, said Giulia. 

Visit Lancaster Brewery’s Website

Exploiting China’s High-end Anti-pollution Mask Market

Christopher Dobbing, a young entrepreneur from the United Kingdom, launched his anti-pollution mask business in China in 2013. As the Founder and CEO of Cambridge Mask Co, the company targets the high-end anti-pollution mask market. Now selling masks through a number of local hospitals, schools, corporations and retailers around the world, Chris has successfully diversified his distribution channels both online and offline. 

In his preparation to set up a company in China, Chris used the EU SME Centre’s consultation service to understand the company registration process and certifications needed to sell his masks on the China market. The Centre also provided him free temporary office space while he was looking for affordable offices in Beijing.

As to the challenges faced by European SMEs in China, Chris put recruiting and retaining staff as the most pressing one. Instead of having three underperforming staff, Chris suggested SMEs invest more in the most dedicated one.

The EU SME Centre was a valuable resource to help me accelerate my start up business selling anti-pollution face masks in China. Having a professional looking space to hold meetings in central Beijing is great, and the legal advice and information guides have proved to be really useful at this key point in setting up here. I would highly recommend the Centre to any small business looking to get started here.

-Christopher Dobbing, Founder and CEO, Cambridge Mask Co

Visit Cambridge Mask Co

Taste of Galicia in China

The Galicia Food Cluster is a non-profit association that provides support services to food and beverage companies from Galicia in Spain. In September 2013, the Cluster successfully established itself as a Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprise (WFOE) in Shanghai in order to better serve a growing number of Galician SMEs interested in the food and beverage market in China.

The move to establish a WFOE in Shanghai was not a snap decision for the Cluster; instead, it involved over one year’s comprehensive market research and strategic business planning. As a crucial first step, the Cluster carefully compared the pros and cons of different legal entity options available for foreign organisations in China, such as a WFOE, a Foreign Invested Commercial Enterprise (FICE) and a Representative Office (RO). The Centre’s legal team helped the Cluster evaluate the feasibilities of each legal entity option, and revealed the difficulties for a foreign association to register a WFOE in China. As a part of the solution, the Centre’s legal advisor suggested the Cluster to register a company in Spain and then have this new company register a WFOE in China. 

As to its future plan, the Cluster aims to expand its network in China step by step and develop more partnerships between Galician food and beverage SMEs and their Chinese counterparts.  

Visit Galicia Food Cluster website

A French SME’s Travels on the Belt & Road

Siveco China is a French SME specialised in maintenance and facility management consulting. It has been operating in China successfully for more than 10 years with more than 850 customer sites, utilising advanced technological tools to help Chinese plants, facilities and infrastructure owners increase competitiveness in the fast-changing domestic and global markets.

Siveco China’s involvement in the Belt & Road can be traced back to many years ago when it started to assist Chinese EPC (Engineering, Procurement and Construction) companies to maintain their overseas projects in Southeast Asian countries. One of its clients is China National Electric Equipment Corporation (CNEEC). Siveco China provides computerised maintenance management system (CMMS) and related services for the client’s two power plants in Malaysia and Indonesia. Later on, it developed more projects in countries including Brunei, Laos and Thailand. In 2012, its business also expanded to Algeria with new clients from South Korea. 

When reflecting on the company’s success in China, Bruno Lhopiteau, the Founder and General Manager of Siveco China, considered their long experience working with Chinese infrastructure projects combined with abilities to work with international clients as the key factors.

“I would also say that our experience in China, such a highly competitive market, has also made us very fierce and tenacious, with both extreme survival skills ready for short-term business as well as a very long-term strategic view towards the market. I think these are the characteristics of companies that succeed in China”, said Bruno.

As for the company’s future plan, Siveco China intends to target on the Belt & Road countries where Chinese and Korean firms are active, by talking directly to major infrastructure owners, usually the government ministries. It has a wide range of client profiles and plans to work more with overseas Chinese investors primarily in oil and gas projects and large Chinese state-owned enterprises in waste, water and power markets. It has also set up a dedicated team to help its clients better understand the system and how it adds value to their tenders. 

Siveco China has also observed some changing trends in this industry after working with Chinese clients for so many years. For example, it recently carried out a survey on “Maintenance in China” together with Shanghai University’s Sino-European School of Technology, which showed an increasing awareness among Chinese companies towards the importance of maintenance and risk prevention involved in operating large infrastructure projects. 

The company first came across the EU SME Centre at a business event in Suzhou, and has been using the Centre as a source of information on various topics including regulations, intellectual property, commercial development, and as a place to find experience from other companies. The Centre also published a case study to introduce the company’s experiences to more European SMEs. 

Leveraging Centre’s instrumental resources, the company has developed a more refined understanding of the Chinese market. 

“I think the Centre is an invaluable source of experience, especially for new entrants to avoid common mistakes and more generally to get ‘inspired’ from other SMEs, even those operating in totally different sectors. I particularly enjoy reading the case studies for this reason. The EU SME Centre is highly complementary of the chambers of commerce, which provide different services.”

– Bruno Lhopiteau, General Manager of Siveco China

To learn more about Siveco China, visit its website here.

Visit Siveco China’s Website

Importing Bottles of Health to China

Healthy Imports is an Irish enterprise that specialises in importing and distributing healthy high quality food and beverage products from the EU into mainland China. After successfully establishing a WFOE Company in Dongguan China, the company made sure it was only working with competent and trustworthy sub-distributors and was very careful on how the products were marketed. Its biggest achievement is the successful marketing and distributorship of Rocwell Mineral Water. Many European F&B producers are searching for a reliable and experienced agent in China and the demand for their products in China is high. Healthy Imports managed to take advantage of this high market potential on both sides: the enterprise is expanding with a second office in Shanghai, hiring more employees at the same time.

One of the key factors of Healthy Imports’ success is its good preparation and patience in making the correct decisions that is vital to success in China.

During research, the team often resorted to the EU SME Centre’s Knowledge Centre. When making important decisions on their China strategy, the management enquired with the Centre’s legal experts in order to confirm the information they previously gathered. The detailed and practical replies made them feel more secure and confident in their decisions, Healthy Imports CEO Noel Farrell recalls.

“To succeed is to understand and adapt”, the company’s motto, highlights one of the key factors for its success: The team was conscious of adapting to the local business culture and never stopped learning. Healthy Imports has shown that if there is market potential for your product and you enter the market well prepared, big success and considerable growth are more than possible. 

The EU SME Centre gives SMEs a sense of security. It is great to be able to enquire in one place about diverse questions of interest for an SME in China. The ‘Knowledge Centre’ is the only database that provides all relevant information in one place, from practical advice like dos and don’ts in negotiations to legal information in the law database.

-Noel Farrell, CEO Healthy Imports Ltd

Visit Healthy Imports website

Meet the EU SME Teams